Killer Queen Cake
#WhenIWalkInSitUpStraight

INGREDIENTS

150g almond flour

150g powdered sugar

55g egg whites

150g granulated sugar

37g water (yes grams!)

55g liquefied egg whites

1 tsp vanilla extract

1tsp lemon flavouring

5 drops yellow food gel

 

Decorations

1 cup lemon curd

100g white chocolate

1 tbsp coconut oil, melted

 

Meringue frosting

200g egg whites

250g caster sugar

1 tsp vanilla extract

METHOD

Makes 30

Level: Medium

Meringue frosting

Begin by filling a medium sized pot with water to about ¼ of the way. Let it come to a gentle boil.

 

Separate your egg whites from your yolks in a large, very clean, glass or metal mixing bowl. We only need the egg whites for this recipe so you can set the yolks aside for a different recipe. If you need ideas there are loads on the internet but my go recipe for using egg yolks is custard.

 

Add your sugar to the egg whites and use a whisk to mix them together.

 

Put your bowl of egg whites and sugar mixture on top of the pot of boiling water. Use a whisk to whisk as your egg whites gently cook. This is called the double boiler method. Make sure the bottom of the bowl is not touching the water in the pot otherwise you’ll end up with scrambled eggs.

 

Continue gently whisking for about 3-4 minutes. What you want to do is whisk until the sugar is completely dissolved. The best way to check that it’s dissolved is by running it through two fingers. If you can’t feel the sugar granules then it’s time to take it off the stove.

 

Add the egg whites to the bowl of a stand mixer. Fit the mixer with the whisk attachment and whisk on high speed for about 4-5 minutes. The mixture will become thick and glossy and will begin to cool.

 

Please note: you want to use your mringue frosting right away is it will aerate pretty quickly. If this happens by the time you’ve filled all your macarons, simply whisk on high speed for 60 seconds until smooth again. You’ll also need to serve these the same day you frost them.

 

Macarons

Add the powdered sugar and almond flour into a food processor and pulse 4-5 times or until well combined. Take care not to pulse too many times otherwise you’ll risk releasing the oils in the almonds. Pulsing these two ingredients does two things. It will help get rid of any lumps in the sugar and will help grind the almond meal into smaller pieces. Alternatively, you may sift the two ingredients together. This must be done at least 3 times.

 

Empty the almond mixture into a large clean glass or metal mixing bowl. Add the first portion of egg whites (55g). Use a spatula to mix everything together until it forms a paste. Cover with plastic wrap and set aside.

 

To make the sugar syrup add the granulated sugar and water into a small saucepan. Give it a very gentle stir with a teaspoon to get everything well combined. After this point don’t mix the syrup again. Bring to a boil on a medium high heat, then turn down to a simmer. As the syrup bubbles away it will splatter small bubbles of sugared water on the sides of the pot. Use a pastry brush dabbed in a little bit of water to brush those back into the syrup. This will help prevent the syrup from crystallising.

 

For this recipe you’ll need a candy thermometer to help you measure the temperature of the syrup. When the syrup reaches 115C / 240F, add the second portion of egg whites (55g) to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with a whisk attachment, and start whisking them on medium/high speed to help break them apart and get them frothy.

 

When the syrup reaches 118C / 244F, carefully pour the very hot syrup into the egg whites in a slow and steady stream while the mixer is on high speed. Please be careful when doing this part. Number one because the syrup is hot, but also if you add your syrup too quickly you’ll cook the egg whites and they’ll turn to soup. Once the you’ve poured all the sugar syrup into the egg whites, continue whisking on high speed for about 3 minutes before you add the vanilla extract and yellow food gel.

 

Continue whipping for another 4-5 minutes. Once your meringue has become thick and glossy and has cooled down close to room temperature, stop the mixer and gently scrape down the bowl, then whisk on high speed for an extra couple of minutes.

 

The next part is the mixing stage. Otherwise known as ‘macaronage’, and is super important. It’s where most people go wrong, including me until I took a trip to Paris and was physically shown how to do it by a French pastry chef.

 

Grab a spatula full of the meringue and fold it into the almond-sugar paste. Mix until well combined. This allows the mixture to thin out a little before you add the rest of the meringue to the sugar paste.  Different people mix macaron batter in different ways, some people count the amount of times they mix. I think it’s better to know the consistency to look out for. I like to go around the bowl with my spatula and then through the middle. You want to continue doing that until you reach the ribbon stage. The ribbon stage is when the batter falls off your spatula in a ribbon, without breaking, and then disappears back into the rest of the batter after about 10 seconds. That’s when you know the batter is ready to pipe.

 

Spoon the batter into a piping bag fitted with a medium round tip.

 

Pipe rounds of batter about 3cm (1 inch) in diameter, spacing them 2cm apart on (flat) baking trays lined with silicone baking mats or baking paper (not greaseproof paper). If you’re using baking paper add small dabs of the macaron batter on each corner of the tray to help the baking paper stick to the baking tray so it doesn’t fly around in the oven and ruin your macarons.

 

Gently tap the tray on your work surface. This will help bring out any air bubbles that might be in your uncooked cookies.

 

The next thing you want to do is let your macarons dry out in the open air for about 30-60 minutes. Drying time can depend on the weather that day or how much humidity there is in the air. Drying your macarons helps them form a skin. The skin is super important because it means that when you bake your macarons and the steam escapes from the cookie, it will escape from the bottom forming the iconic ‘feet’ of a macaron. So when you can gently touch your uncooked macarons and they’re not sticky to the touch, then you know they’re ready to bake.

 

Preheat a fan forced oven to 140C (280F) or 160C (320F) for a conventional oven. Bake each tray one at a time for 12 minutes. If you feel your oven is causing the macarons to brown on one side (usually the side closest to the fan) turn the tray around about half way through baking. Once they’re baked, let them cool completely before you try taking them off the tray.

 

To prepare the white chocolate splatter add the white chocolate and melted coconut oil into a microwave safe bowl. Microwave for 20 seconds at a time mixing each time until smooth. Use the spoon to splatter the macarons with it. Pop them in the fridge for 30 min to chill.

 

Fit the end of a piping bag with a Wilton #32 piping tip and frost a swirl of the freshly made meringue frosting. Fill the centre with lemon curd before sandwiching with another cookie.

You might also like...

RECIPES

 

Basic Recipes

Cupcake Recipes

Cake Recipes

Macaron Recipes

Vegan Recipes

No-Bake Recipes

Frosting Recipes

Tips & Tricks

I Have A Recipe Suggestion!

Contact

I Have A Recipe Suggestion!

About

Contact Nick

Business Enquiries

Brand Deck

TSL.2017.LOGO.BLACK.png

Hey there! My name is Nick Makrides! I'm guessing you love baking as much as I do which is how you stumbled upon my website!

 

This is the best spot on the internet to learn how to make the most amazing desserts that don't just look impressive, they also taste delicious and are easy to make!

Copyright ©2017 All rights reserved

  • Facebook - Black Circle
  • Pinterest - Black Circle
  • YouTube - Black Circle
  • Instagram - Black Circle
  • Twitter - Black Circle